Gluten Free Living

How to Eat Gluten Free

 Gluten Free is the new Vegetarian – almost every grocery store now has gluten free breads and products in their freezer sections, and crackers and baking mixes in the  aisles. Websites abound on not only celiac disease resources (a disease caused by severe gluten allergy) but on gluten free recipes, resources, and restaurants in almost any geographical area.

So, what is all the hype? Why go gluten free, and why are so many people changing their diets? The bottom line is that gluten sensitivity begins with the immune system of the digestive tract becoming hypersensitive to gluten proteins. The body creates antibodies to the sequence of amino acids, which enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. Whenever these antibodies see that same sequence (which is repeated as a small part of many tissues of the body exposed to blood i.e. thyroid, joints, brain, lungs, skin) they attack that tissue as if it was gluten. This creates “auto” or “self” antibodies, which are then produced in greater and greater numbers and cause disease.

Therefore, gluten has been linked to autoimmune diseases such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimotos thyroid disease and multiple sclerosis. These are end stage conditions that develop years after smaller warning signals such as headaches, digestive disturbance, asthma, allergies, psoriasis, alopecia, insomnia and various “undiagnosible” ailments. Sometimes eliminating the offending foods or doing testing to assess your body’s immune response is the only way to assess if food is an underlying factor in your ill health.

Gluten is a protein that is found in the following Grains:

  • Wheat
  • Rye
  • Barley
  • Kamut
  • Spelt
  • Oats is technically gluten free but very often contaminated in manufacturing.

Therefore, people with a gluten sensitivity or allergy cannot eat any of these grains, or products that contain them such as soy sauce, gravy, doritos or other gluten based products. Oats are technically not a gluten containing grain, but should be avoided unless it states “gluten free” on the package.

Non Gluten Grains which can be eaten by people with gluten allergies include:

  • amaranth: highly nutritious, tiny seeds available whole or as a
  • rice: including brown and white rice, Arborio, basmati and rice flour
  • corn: including cornmeal, cornstarch and corn flour
  • millet: small seeds, eaten whole or combined with other gluten-free flours
  • quinoa: small seeds that can be eaten whole, as a hot cereal or ground into flour
  • buckwheat: used whole, cracked or ground into flour
  • oats: gluten free oats and oat bran
  • tapioca: made from cassava root, often combine with gluten-free flours
  • teff: very small black grain, contains symbiotic yeast
  • arrowroot: a starch used as a thickener, superior to cornstarch, blends well with gluten-free flours

Potatoes, sweet potatoes, squash, and other starchy vegetables can also generally be enjoyed by those who are gluten free.

For the most thorough information on gluten allergy, see http://www.thedr.com./store.html and order Unlocking The Mysteries of Wheat and Gluten Intolerance for yourself. Dr. Tom DC offers eloquent and thorough evidence based information on why it is worth at least trying gluten free living for one month and then reassess.

Many people have a wheat sensitivity or allergy, but can tolerate other gluten grains like spelt and kamut. Some people with a wheat, but not gluten sensitivity will later develop a gluten sensitivity. Corn, potato, dairy and/or soy sensitivities are also common in addition to gluten. For this reason, it is best to start your food eliminations by eliminating all of the above products, and slowly reintroducing each gluten grain as well as corn, potatoes, and soy separately to judge your individual reactions.

AVOID FOR GLUTEN -FREE SHOPPING:

  • look for labels that say – wheat (or whole wheat) flour, wheat germ, bran, farina, graham flour, semolina, gluten, modified food starch, wheat starch, vegetable starch, vegetable gum
  • Pastas – spaghetti, vermicelli, macaroni…..
  • Soups – commercially canned
  • Desserts – most contain wheat – so read carefully
  • Cereals and breads – as with desserts – read labels carefully
  • It’s probably best to go to health food store in order to find alternatives. Most breads, bagels, wraps, pizza doughs, etc are kept in the freezer sections
  • For persons allergic to wheat, but not to gluten, you can use flour substitutes such as spelt or kamut (these are the most similar to wheat); rye, oats and barley can also be eaten.

TIPS FOR A GLUTEN-FREE DIET:

  • focus on protein, vegetables, fruits, and healthy fats like avocado 
  • Lots of delicious gluten free options abound: Tray various  pasta, breads, crackers, etc until you find what your taste buds prefer.
  • Avoid any food that contains wheat, barley, rye, oats – as well as spelt and kamut. Also, remember that gluten can be found in most processed foods, including soups, sauces, gravies, and of course in breads, cereals, and desserts.
  • 40% of people allergic to gluten are also allergic to soy and/or corn – which are often found in “gluten-free” breads, etc.
  • READ LABELS on everything the first few months to find hidden sources of gluten.

Eating Out and Travelling:

Most cream based soups and chowders are made with a gluten base. Boone’s in Portland has a gluten free chowder, bisque, crab cakes etc if you are craving those.

It is pretty easy being gluten free in restaurants once you get the hang of it. Focus on protein and vegetables, fancy salads and avoid gravies, pasta, gnocchi and sandwiches. If you are craving a burger, ordering it without the bun is pretty standard in today’s low carb world. Steak and arugula salad is always a good choice.

Sadly, fried treats are out the window like calamari, fried clams, fish and chips… once it gets battered it is almost always a wheat base. French fries are also often battered. Best to ask ahead of time instead of getting a delicious plate of inedible fries. Frontier restaurant in Brunswick has delicious GF fish and chips, and rice flour calamari.  Not cheap but delicious!

Fish options and mussels or raw oysters rarely have gluten unless they are fried or pan fried. Eating fish at home with rice and salad is a great nutritious option too.

Some places have gluten free sandwich bread but most places don’t. In a pinch on the road, subway will make a “chopped salad” which is basically a sub in lettuce/salad. Planning your food and having fruit, yogurts, nuts & seeds or trail mix, protein bars, and even leftovers or sandwiches on GF bread you make yourself before you leave become important while travelling.

What else? Gluten free breads and crackers abound.  I personally like Millet breads the best – available in Whole Foods GF freezer section. Rice breads tend to be very dense and gummy, but are the most common across the board. Mary’s Gone Crackers are the best GF crackers, followed by Nut Thins and Glutino brand. Glutino also makes a great pretzel. Rice cakes can have a bad reputation but are a quick tasty snack and great vehicle for dips, cheese, avocado and almond butter.

Sweets: Lots of gluten free cookies and treats are available! Any ice cream or candy without “cookie dough” or brownies or cones is usually GF. Many coffee places have at least one GF option. Flourless chocolate torte, chocolate mousse, crème brule or pannacotta are restaurant dessert options that are usually safe.

 

Tips for Gluten-Free Baking

FLOUR

GOOD TO KNOW

Equivalent to 1 Cup of Wheat Flour
 

Amaranth Flour

 

-best combined with other flours that  have more cohesion (arrowroot, tapioca, bean)

-add to baked goods, pancakes/waffle recipes

 

1 cup

 

Arrowroot Starch

 

-add 1tbsp to an equal parts of cold water before adding to dishes as a thickener

-combines well with gluten-free flours to give them cohesion

 

1/2 cup

 

Bean Flour

 can be gassy. Often used in Paleo cooking.  

3/4 cup

 

Buckwheat Flour

 

-makes a dark, heavy bread

-use with rice flour

 

7/8 cup (1 cup minus 2 tbsp)

 

Chestnut Flour

 

-used to sweeten baked goods

-adds lightness and creaminess

-use alone or mix w/ other flours

 

Chickpea Flour

 

-too dense and rich to use on its own

 

7/8 cup (1 cup minus 2 tbsp)

 

Cornmeal

 

-makes a light bread

-mix with equal parts of cold water before adding as a thickener

-best combined with small amounts of other flours

-stone ground is more nutritious

 

1 cup

 

Cornstarch

 

thickener

 

3/4 cup

1 cup corn flour

 

Millet Flour

 

-always combine with other flours

 

1 cup

 

     Potato Flour/Starch

 

-best combined with other flours

thickener

 

5/8 cup flour

3/4 cup starch

 

Quinoa Flour

 

-best combined w/ other flours. May have a beany taste.

 

Rice Flour

 can be grainy, does not rise.  

7/8 cup

(1 cup minus 2 tbsp)

 

Soy Flour

    -makes bread or baked goods more moist and smooth

-best if add small amounts to other flours

-u       -use only 20% soy flour in recipe, decrease temperature by 25 degrees

 

 

3/4 cup

 

Tapioca Starch

 

-thins if reheated

-combines well with gluten flours to give them cohesion, thickener

 

1 cup

 

Teff Flour

 

-do not add to yeast breads because it has its own symbiotic yeast

 

Flour Combinations: equivalent to 1 cup of white or whole wheat flour

1 cup soy flour + 1/4 cup potato starch

1/2 cup soy flour + 1/2 cup potato starch

5/8 cup rice flour + 1/3 cup potato flour

1/2 cup corn starch + 1/2 cup rice/potato flour

1/2 cup arrowroot + 1/2 cup potato flour

For 2 cups of flour good for baking cookies:

1 cup of brown rice flour + ½ cup of tapioca rice flour + ½ cup white rice flour + 1 tsp of xanthan gum.

Namaste company also makes a “Perfect Flour” gluten free mix of flours that you can buy and use with any recipe. Makes cookies really easy!! They also have a great pancake mix if you love pancakes.

Tips for substituting wheat flour:

  • do not be concerned if batter appear thinner than wheat batters, this is common
  • add 1/2 tsp baking powder per cup of substitute flour; add just before cooking because it loses its potency when mixed with liquid and allowed to sit
  • refrigerating dough 1/2 hour helps improve texture
  • do not bake anything thicker than 4 inches
  • when baking, lower the temperature a little
  • baking time is usually longer, especially if egg or milk is eliminated from the recipe
  • experiment with your options – buy small quantities from a bulk food store and make half recipes first

For thickening, the following quantities equal 1tbsp of wheat flour:

*Arrowroot 1 tbsp = 2 tbsp wheat flour

*Corn starch 1 tbsp

*Potato flour/starch 1/2 tbsp

*Rice flour 1/2 tbsp

*Tapioca flour 1/2 tbsp – my favorite

Share

The Lost Art

I am sick in an invisible way that people cant really see, and I don’t really feel – much. I can take a pill and make it mostly unnoticeable. Except for the fact that my hair falls out in handfuls with a certain kind of stress…

I consider myself an expert in self-care. And yet, I can hardly find the time to do the “little” things that I know could help. Like, nettle hair rinses, getting at least 8 hours of sleep every night, taking my fish oil, and eating more protein. Instead, I keep myself too busy and dull myself with things that make me feel better for a few hours, but never in the long run. I have fallen into the mindlessness of  modern health care where I want a pill to do the work of healing for me. Dammit!

We all have levels of health maintenance we are willing to do on a regular basis. Vitamins, exercise, water, organics, therapy, whatever. We each have a certain degree of self care required to maintain the status quo of daily function. But, what happens when that balance is tipped and we need to actually recover from an illness, injury, or accident?

I offer you an invitation to step off the rat wheel of everyday living, and create a luminal space for healing. A luminal space is an anthropology term that refers to a period of time “outside of time” – a step out of everyday living. Some health crisis force this through body fluid effluvia that ties one to the bathroom, or physical disability that prevents mobility. Too often we are able to power through a cold, or anxiety attack or injury and do not engage in the art of self care to allow actual healing. This is what snowballs into chronic illness / disease or chronic pain.

I have been “sick” for at least 9 months, but I haven’t made more than a few half-hearted efforts to engage in deep self care. I have taken lots of prescriptions and had lots of blood tests, but is that truly healing medicine? I finally broke my baby toe last week, and have been suddenly forced to slow down by immobility. I am doing hydrotherapy, making castor oil packs, cooking and eating good food, meditating, saying no to social engagements I don’t deeply want to do, and getting sleep. These are some of the cornerstones of deep self care.

It is very difficult to give ones self approval to close the door on society and expectations and family, and friends, and chores, and domestic duties, and distractions, and choose to do something solely for the self instead. We are culturally programmed to take care of business, pleasure, family, kids, dogs, and our homes before we take care of the inner self. If you are sick, at any level, you will heal faster, and better if you take the time to practice deep medicine by taking the time to take care of your self.

I am here to help you do that. And, I give myself permission to offer that same wisdom and practice for my self. The pills and the maintenance are not enough. We must engage the luminal, lost art of deep self care for complete health and healing.

 

Share

Mediterranean Adventure II

We were concerned that traveling Gluten Free would be tough. And not even just gluten free – I can’t eat potato or corn, and my sweetheart can’t have rice. So, we were both headed abroad knowing that food choices could be tough. We had the good fortune of staying with family, so for most of the journey we had a kitchen and fridge to stock with staples we could rely on. For me – mostly eggs, rice cakes, delicious olive paste, incredible fresh green olives. For my sweetheart – she had the bonus of finding gluten free bread, plus corn cakes, jam, and yogurt. Then we  shared fruit, veggies and local cheeses. She brought her own corn pasta, and I had no trouble finding rice pasta as needed in the local “Veritas” (organic) market for family dinners. We even found quinoa! Local markets and/or supermarkets also had lovely fresh meats, fish and produce for family dinners. We both brought some snack bars (Kits Organics for her and Luna Protein for me) as well as trail mixes. Of course, there were also lots of delicious treats we could both have. Europe has an impressive array of yogurts, puddings, and other cold delights in small jars. (Less ice cream though, in the freezer sections.)

Overall, food turned out to be less of a problem than we feared. When going out, my sweetheart was invariably able to get “patatas bravas,” a local dish of fried potato with a yummy spicy mayonnaise. Tapas (or pinxtos as they are called in San Sebastian) were harder for me to navigate, so often I just didn’t. Dinners out were easier – I could almost always find some delicious fish or chicken and vegetable options in the Menu del Dia – a 10-15 Euro daily menu with 3 courses and wine and coffee included. As my sweetheart is more sensitive to gluten and cant get away with any exposure, she usually stuck to Ensalada Mixta (salad, tuna, olives, and hardboiled eggs) with a potato side dish. All in all, it worked out well. We weren’t able to sample the breadth of Spanish gourmet cuisine, but we still had some flavorful dishes and local delicacies.

As a Naturopathic Doctor, I was constantly assessing the Mediterranean Diet and to see how the classic reputation of the region matched the real fare. As I suspected, there was plenty of bread, cheese, sugar, and packaged foods available as in the Standard American Diet (SAD.) There were a few noticeable differences though that may account for some of Europe’s lower body weights and improved life expectancy. First, there was no bacon. Yes, “bacin” was on some menus, but it was peameal-style bacon, pan-fried and not the true “bacon” of North American fame. Second, beef was rare to see on a menu or in the supermarkets, and was quite expensive. This made sense as we drove across the country, as there were very few cows. European terrain is not made for grazing the way Texas is.

Finally, and perhaps most impressive to me was the rest stops for food along highways. Each one was set up like a classy buffet restaurant, complete with chefs behind the food casing presenting grilled vegetables, roasted chicken, and a wide arrays of sandwiches, jambon, fruit and cheese choices. There were mini bottles of wine and cans of beer at every register, as if instead of being on a roadtrip one was intentionally stopping at that location for a meal. And stop everyone did, even for coffee. The American in me was shocked that people were literally getting perfect little iced espressos and walking to sit down and drink it before they got back on the road. We are such a to go culture! The contrast was very strong, and was I think the best illustration of the differences between our SAD diet culture and that of the Mediterranean. They sit down and savor a meal, a coffee, and a moment in time. It’s a lifestyle, a way of thinking, and a paradigm. We eat on the go, “para llavales”. We Rush, wolfing down food, eating mindlessly as we multitask and gulping down our beverages while we push on ahead. And we pack on the pounds and generate chronic disease as we go along, coercing our nervous systems into simultaneously digesting and running at the same time.

I am still filtering through layers of impressions, photos and reflecting on the whole experience of world travel. I highly recommend Spain to anyone – Barcelona is the second most popular tourist destination in the world, and well worth the hype. Traveling gluten free was not a problem; we were able to find great local resources and food options, especially for a food adventurist. For those who can eat gluten, there is an incredible world of tapas out there just waiting your arrival! But do yourself a favor – eat like you have all the time in the world.

Share

Resolving an Arthritis Flare – for My Dad

Chronic inflammation can cycle into snowballs of pain that catch us off guard. For those with a familial tendency towards rheumatism, arthritis can become quite severe. Joint inflammation usually takes the autoimmune form of rheumatoid arthritis or the inflammatory/ immune joint presentation of osteoarthritis.

An acute osteoarthritis presentation can be effective managed with Naturopathic Medicine. To follow is a recipe for resolution of an acute (meaning, immediate or aggressive) flare up of arthritis that may be causing moderate to extreme pain and inhibiting mobility.

1.You will need to rest as much as possible for 7-10 days. Plan to stay home and lay low whenever possible. Get up every 2-3 hours (except while sleeping) for 10-20 minutes of stretching and gentle exercises like walking in nature, Pilates, or gentle yoga. Wii Fit balance and core strength exercises are fun and support rehabilitation.  Plan your life accordingly. You may need to work from home if possible, reschedule activities, and modify your lifestyle during this time. Remember that this is necessary to address the pain. It is likely your pain and inflammatory levels will be up to 50% resolved by the tenth day of treatment. During this time, also take a daily bath, soaking the affected joints for up to 20 minutes.  I recommend using Epsom magnesium bath salts with 10-15 drops of lavender essential oil or a bath salt of your choice. Follow with 20 minutes of icing the affected joint.

This plan will not cure your arthritis. Your will continue all conventional medications used during the treatment although you may be able to decrease pain medication as needed. This does not replace the need for surgery or other scheduled plans prescribed by your physicians and specialists.

1. For the 7-10 days spent at home, you will follow an Anti-Inflammatory Diet. This is best continued until joint replacement is successful; however, it is crucial during the initial rest window. Studies have proven that nutrition is directly linked with inflammation. By eliminating foods known to increase systemic inflammation, you can reduce your own inflammatory load. This allows your body to begin healing. For more information on The Inflammatory Diet set up an appointment with Dr. Masina Wright ND. http://thewrightdoctor.com/contact-information/

2. Zyflamend Nighttime- 2 capsules 3 times daily. This is a modern formulation of 6-10 botanicals to treat inflammation, joint pain and rheumatism using herbal medicine. New Chapter has combined these into an effective and well researched formula called “Zyflamend.” http://www.newchapter.com/zyflamend The PM version also contains a small amount of relaxing herbs which are helpful for supporting a restful attitude during your healing. You may continue this for up to one year’s duration before a break is needed.  This product is safe to take with most narcotic and non-narcotic pain medication including Vicodin, Oxycodone, Ibuprofen, Tylenol 3 and Ibuprofen. However, do not drive while taking this formulation. If you must drive, use the Zyflammend original formula.

3. Nordic Naturals Omega Joint Plus – 3 capsules daily with or without food. This is a premium joint care formula containing the required daily 1500mg of glucosamine sulphate as well as anti-inflammatory levels of EPA and DHA. The product is expensive at ~$50/bottle for one month supply however, it is worth it. Switch to this product during your first month of resolution treatment for best results, even if you have other fish oil or glucosamine supplements. http://www.nordicnaturals.com/en/Products/Product_Details/514/?ProdID=1548

During your 7-10 day rest time, you can take your other supplements as well, or take a supplement vacation and focus on the above products only to streamline your protocol.

This is the skeleton treatment plan. This is a great place to start! As a Naturopathic Doctors, we individualize every treatment plan to fit each patient’s unique identity. If you do not get the results you are looking for or have trouble adhering to the program, consider seeing a ND in your area. In addition to the above protocol, specific neutraceuticals to address sleep, anxiety, digestion, or other issues may also be prescribed in a consultation. Classical homeopathy is also extremely useful in complex cases. It is safe with complicated pharmaceutical treatments and provides lasting results.

Share

Nutrition to Strengthen Liver Yin

     Modern culture is Yang obsessed. We go-go-go, we seek sun, we burn the candle at both ends, we exercise vigorously, and we love stimulants. It is a rare bird that has enough quiet, meditative alone time, in a dim or dark environment. This is the Yin state – nourishing, moistening, dark, and quiet – Yin builds what Yang wears down.

Every organ of the body has a Yin and a Yang aspect. Some organs (Spleen, Liver, Heart, and Lung for example) are naturally more Yin in Nature. Other organs (Stomach, Gall Bladder, Small Intestine and Large Intestine for example) are more Yang in nature. These “natures” were determined by the functions each organ enact as well as more energetic attributes. Supporting the natural state of each organ will optimize health, and promote healthy functioning.

      Much is said about detoxifying the Liver, and reducing its Yang (brought on by alcohol, drugs and stimulants) but what happens when you actually have deficient Liver Yin that needs to be nourished?  Stripping an already deficient organ will create further disharmony that will eventually manifest as pathology.

      A diagnosis of Liver Yin deficiency means that this aspect of the Liver organ network is compromised. The Liver not only detoxifies, it has many other (building) jobs including cholesterol metabolism, vitamin storage, bile production, and blood reservoir. Blood is a Yin substance (all fluids are yin) and many B12 and iron anemias can be diagnosed early on as a Liver Yin deficiency by a trained Acupuncturist. Thin brittle nails, anemia, sallow skin, easy bruising, hair loss, blurred vision, tinnitus, dizziness, infertility  and some tremors  are all associated with a Liver Yin deficiency diagnosis.

Nutrition is one of the best ways to support and recover Liver Yin. A diet that is nutrient rich and nourishing is essential, as is sitting down to relax while you eat and chewing thoroughly to savor flavors. The diet should also include plenty of fluids, especially in the form of soups. Meals consist of 40% easily digested complex carbohydrates like whole grains and starchy root vegetables. Another 40% of the diet is cooked vegetables. Proteins comprise 10-20% of the diet, with a focus on high quality organic or grass fed sources. Healthy fats fill the other remaining 5-10%.

Below is a list of recommended foods to nourish Liver Yin. Do not limit your nutritional intake to only these foods. Instead follow the guidelines above of the optimum ratios of carbohydrates, vegetables and proteins, and add the recommended foods from the list below within your meals. Where ever possible choose organically grown foods to avoid genetically modified ingredients.

Foods to Nourish Liver Yin Deficiency

 Zucchini, squash, potatoes, sweet potatoes, string beans, beets,

Mushrooms including wood ears & tremella,

Tomatoes, spinach, carrots, parsley,

Molasses

Apples, banana, mulberries, mango, coconut, peaches, lychee fruit, melons,

Grapes, raisins, cherries, plums

Olive oil, flaxseed oil, almond oil

Vegemite, kelp, spirulina, wheatgrass

 Oats, rice, millet, barley

Adzuki beans, black beans, mung beans

Organic cow, goat and sheep yogurt

Tempeh, tofu, miso

Nuts & seeds, black sesame seeds (great as a condiment!)

Eggs

Pork, chicken, Chinese black boned chicken, duck

Mackerel, sardines, oysters, mussels, clams

Cuttlefish, squid, perch, eel

Foods to Restrict or Avoid

Chilies, cinnamon, garlic, ginger, onions, shallots, leeks, basil, cloves, wasabi

Coffee, black tea

Vinegar, pickles

Lamb, shrimp, veal

Citrus fruits

Cigarettes, alcohol

Recreational stimulants

Activities that build whole-body Yin nourishment are also encouraged while working specifically on Liver Yin. Rest more. Read. Spend some quiet, alone contemplative time in a cool, dark room with a candle lit (taking a bath is a nice way to do this.) Exercises like Tai Chi and Yoga are more Yin building than Yang in nature. Drink warm water and lemon. Get extra sleep. Breathe.

References:

Clinical Handbook Of Internal Medicine, Vol. 2. MacLean & Lyttleton. University of Western Sydney: Australia. 2002.

Chinese Dietary Therapy. Liu, J. Churchill Livingston: Edinburgh. 1995.

The Healing Cuisine of China. Zhao & Ellis. Healing Arts Press: Vermont. 1998.

An interesting theoretical write up: http://www.indiadivine.org/audarya/ayurveda-health-wellbeing/997986-liver-yin-deficiency-patterns-derived-patterns.html

Share

Its Not You. Its Your Food!

Chances are, you are having some kind of allergic response to the foods you are eating. For some people this manifests as weight gain, puffiness, or bloating. For others its drippy nose, itchy mouth and red eyes. Someone else manifests their allergic response as constipation or diarrhea, and someone else has creaky sore knees and chronic urinary tract infections. How can one set of reactions have so many manifestations? Because we are all different types of people with different genetic and systemic vulnerabilities. Our immune systems are also unique, and respond individually  to stress.

70% of our immune system is in our guts. It is our digestive immune systems job to separate out food from bacteria and parasites and viruses and other “non-self” things that we ingest. However, with age, or over-medication, or stress, or a whole host of other complicating factors our digestive immune system can become imbalanced and start to identify foods as “enemies.” Then, every time that food is eaten, we mount an immune attack against it! Creating inflammation, swelling, mucus production – a whole mini-battle scene in your gut. When this happens daily, it starts to affect the organs involved and creates local damage, which impairs intestinal integrity. Then, little particles of inflammation leak into the bloodstream and negatively affect distant organs. Thus, the “personalized” food sensitivity effects of bladder, respiratory, joint, brain or other system dysfunction.

Most common allergenic foods:

  • Dairy, wheat, soy, corn, eggs, chocolate, oranges (citrus), seafood  (especially shellfish), additives/preservatives, tomatoes, potatoes, strawberries, peanuts, almonds.
  • Hereditary factors do set up susceptibility, as allergies appear to run in families.  For example, if both parents have an allergy/intolerance, then there is a 67% chance that the offspring will be allergic.  Therefore, be extra careful when introducing these foods to babies.

Common physical and symptomatic signs of food allergy:

  • Dark circles under the eyes, puffiness under the eyes, chronic swollen glands, runny nose/nasal drip
  • Canker sores, celiac disease, chronic diarrhea, constipation, gas, gastritis, heart burn/acid reflux, IBS, ulcerative colitis, gallstones
  • Chronic infections, frequent ear infections
  • Bed-wetting, chronic bladder infections, kidney disorders
  • Asthma, chronic bronchitis, wheezing, itchy nose or throat, sinusitis
  • Acne, eczema, hives, itching, skin rash, red (burning) ears
  • Bursitis, joint pain, low back pain, arthritis and arthritic disorders
  • Arrhythmia, edema, fatigue,
  • Headache, migraines
  • Hyperactivity, anxiety, depression, inability to concentrate, insomnia, irritability, mental confusion, seizures

Diagnosis:

Identifying the foods your system is reacting to is important. It can be so varied – wheat for one person, salmon and sesame seeds for another! By identifying the problematic foods, you can also “know your devil.” Even if you still choose to eat the food occasionally, at least you can predict the response and manage it as needed. Knowing the problem often makes the symptoms more bearable!

There are many ways to identify food sensitivities. As a Naturopathic Doctor, I use blood work for people with multiple system involvement or complicated medical histories. The test starts at $269 for 95 foods, and increases for additional foods or for candida antigen identification. The hypoallergenic dietary method is an excellent detoxification diet. It is a great method of self diagnosis for people who have one or two symptoms that may be related to food sensitivities. It is also a fantastic weight loss diet, and I often use it for that reason alone!

  • Hypoallergenic Diet: Food elimination and subsequent reintroduction
  • Bloodwork: IgG testing using bloodspot analysis
  • Applied kinesiology (AK):  Muscle testing for strength/weakness in the presence of the food being tested
  • Vega / Intero Food Test: A biofeedback-like software program based on AK that tests your bodies electrical responses to foods.

I personally am not trained in AK food testing, and have not found a practitioner in Maine who does the Vega style testing.

To minimize immune reactivity & enhance your immune system:

  • Identify and eliminate the foods that you are reacting to.
  • Increase the variety in your diet and rotate foods – do not get stuck eating the same ingredients or foods every day.
  • Eat organic foods! Especially those fruits and vegetables that can’t be peeled and animal products – milk, yoghurt, eggs and meat.
  • Minimize tuna, swordfish, farmed salmon and other large fish known to have heavy metal contamination.
  • Don’t drink tap water! Use a filter or switch to reverse osmosis-treated water to eliminate fluoride, chlorine, and other chemicals that are present.
  • Supplement with antioxidants: vitamins A, C, E, zinc and selenium.
  • Once or twice a year take a course of probiotics (especially if you have just completed a course of antibiotics) – these are the good bacteria that your intestines and your immune system need to function optimally.  You need a probiotic that provides both Lactobacillus and Bifidus bacteria.
  • Don’t suppress stomach acid production with heart burn-relief aids – instead, identify the triggers and eliminate them.  You need that acid to act as a barrier against bacteria, viruses and fungi in our environment.

Recognizing that you probably have food sensitivities, and diagnosing them appropriately is the first step towards feeling (and looking) better. Depending on your age, and how long you have had your symptoms, you may also need to do some digestive system repair. This is a four staged series of treatments that clean up your sites of inflammation, heal your gut lining, and recalibrate your immune systems reactivity. You will be amazed at how fantastic everything starts to feel once all the little chronic health problems disappear!

Share