The Lost Art

I am sick in an invisible way that people cant really see, and I don’t really feel – much. I can take a pill and make it mostly unnoticeable. Except for the fact that my hair falls out in handfuls with a certain kind of stress…

I consider myself an expert in self-care. And yet, I can hardly find the time to do the “little” things that I know could help. Like, nettle hair rinses, getting at least 8 hours of sleep every night, taking my fish oil, and eating more protein. Instead, I keep myself too busy and dull myself with things that make me feel better for a few hours, but never in the long run. I have fallen into the mindlessness of  modern health care where I want a pill to do the work of healing for me. Dammit!

We all have levels of health maintenance we are willing to do on a regular basis. Vitamins, exercise, water, organics, therapy, whatever. We each have a certain degree of self care required to maintain the status quo of daily function. But, what happens when that balance is tipped and we need to actually recover from an illness, injury, or accident?

I offer you an invitation to step off the rat wheel of everyday living, and create a luminal space for healing. A luminal space is an anthropology term that refers to a period of time “outside of time” – a step out of everyday living. Some health crisis force this through body fluid effluvia that ties one to the bathroom, or physical disability that prevents mobility. Too often we are able to power through a cold, or anxiety attack or injury and do not engage in the art of self care to allow actual healing. This is what snowballs into chronic illness / disease or chronic pain.

I have been “sick” for at least 9 months, but I haven’t made more than a few half-hearted efforts to engage in deep self care. I have taken lots of prescriptions and had lots of blood tests, but is that truly healing medicine? I finally broke my baby toe last week, and have been suddenly forced to slow down by immobility. I am doing hydrotherapy, making castor oil packs, cooking and eating good food, meditating, saying no to social engagements I don’t deeply want to do, and getting sleep. These are some of the cornerstones of deep self care.

It is very difficult to give ones self approval to close the door on society and expectations and family, and friends, and chores, and domestic duties, and distractions, and choose to do something solely for the self instead. We are culturally programmed to take care of business, pleasure, family, kids, dogs, and our homes before we take care of the inner self. If you are sick, at any level, you will heal faster, and better if you take the time to practice deep medicine by taking the time to take care of your self.

I am here to help you do that. And, I give myself permission to offer that same wisdom and practice for my self. The pills and the maintenance are not enough. We must engage the luminal, lost art of deep self care for complete health and healing.

 

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Women need Testosterone

When I say Testosterone, what do you think?

Most people think: men, male. Some people think trans,*  transgender, or FTM. Very few people will think “the most abundant sex hormone across a women’s lifespan and an important sex hormone for all genders.”

All of the above is the correct answer.

Estrogen and Testosterone have been sequestered into gendered boxes, but both are equally important sex hormones for human health. Functional and biologically active androgenic receptors are located throughout the body in both sexes. Testosterone receptors are found in the breasts, heart, blood vessels, digestive tract, lung, brain, spinal cord, nerves, bladder, uterus, ovaries, skin, bone, bone marrow, muscles and fat cells of all women. This wide diversity of receptor locations illustrates the panorama of body systems that rely on adequate levels of testosterone for optimal female  function.

And yet, this important hormone is routinely ignored in women of all ages and especially those in their 30’s and 40’s who are exhibiting signs of testosterone deficiency including: dysphoric mood, muscle loss, cognitive decline, insomnia, breast pain, rheumatic and other pain, incontinence and sexual dysfunction.

Think you might be T deficient? Take our Eve test now! http://www.agemanagementcenter.com/eve-scale/

Around menopause, testosterone and other pro-androgens like DHEA, DHEA-S, and androstenedione become the primary hormones available as estrogen and progesterone levels decline. The ovaries stop becoming the major source of hormonal production, and the adrenal glands take over. As early as 1937, testosterone was used as a successful and important bioidentical hormone replacement option for menopausal women.  Seventy-seven years later, doctors still do not routinely address testosterone deficiency in this population, nor do they even test for it!

Symptoms are not enough to assess hormonal balance. Accurate bloodwork including Total Testosterone, Free Testosterone, Sex Hormone Binding Globulin, Estradiol, Total Estrogen, Progesterone and DHEA-S must be assessed to have a clear picture of hormone health for all genders.

Many endogenous hormones can be converted into other hormones, like Testosterone being aromatized to Estradiol and DHEA-S into Testosterone or Estrogen. Understanding these pathways and monitoring the blood levels over time is the best way to achieve optimized hormone status. No hormone should be ignored based on presenting gender or sex, as it is the delicate interplay of hormones that creates vibrant wellness.

For more information on women and testosterone make an appointment to consult with Dr. Wright now. To schedule bloodwork to assess your testosterone and other hormone levels, call Kristen at 207 774-1356. Free initial consults are available.  www.agemanagementcenter.com

References:

Transdermal testosterone therapy improves wellbeing, mood, and sexual function in premenopausal women. Goldstat, Rebecca MPH1; Briganti, Esther MD2; Tran, Jane MD1;
Wolfe, Rory PhD2; Davis, Susan R. MD, PhD1 Menopause. September 2003 – Volume 10 – Issue 5 – pp 390-398

Testosterone therapy in women: Myths and misconceptions Rebecca Glasera,b,∗, Constantine Dimitrakakisc, Maturitas 74 (2013) 230– 234

Current perspectives on testosterone therapy for women. Susan Davis MB, Bs, FRAC-P, PhD., Sonia Davidson MB, Bs, FRAC-P, PhD.  Menopausal Medicine. Volume 2 0 , No. 2 — Ma y 2 0 1 2

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