(Least)* Complicated

Walking the tightrope between being a current MSII medical student and a Naturopathic Doctor is a delicate balance sometimes. I never know whether my career as an expert in alternative medicine is going to be a blackball or a gold star because of the very mixed opinions people have about my former profession in the medical world. My plan, heading into the first day of medical school was not to tell anyone my (second) degree when I started (my third degree) at UNECOM, but it was announced in orientation so my cover was blown.

Being a ND in general is pretty complicated – working outside of insurance in most states is a financial challenge for patients as well as doctors, and public knowledge about the profession is highest on the west coast of the US and Canada, and in more affluent areas of the NorthEast. Many people get excited when I say I am a doctor, then look back blankly when I tell them what kind of medicine I practice(d). People who know the field have reactions that are pretty love: hate. Lots of lovers, quite a few haters, and an ever-growing population of quiet converts who realize that, as one anonymous Twitter medical student said in my recent Twitter Flaming on the topic: people who are interested in alternative medicine are usually trying to take care of their health and make themselves feel better.

IMG_6031I have recently been made aware of a woman who attended a west coast Naturopathic Medicine College who has turned against the profession “with an inside view” and who is engaging in aggressive muckraking. She is getting recognition and validation as an “insider” to Naturopathic Medicine as she did complete our 4-year postgraduate degree before she quit and moved to Germany. She has started a petition to defame the profession worldwide. The unfortunate thing is she lives outside the US and is not accountable for US or CDN slander laws. What she is doing is poignantly effective because she has inflamed the haters. One doctor in particular is a physician and educator with the influential Doctors in Training Boards Exam Review Series. He has a large Twitter following and has enthusiastically joined in the slander of the Naturopathic Profession. I worry about how his “expert” personal opinion will effect future generations of physicians who have not considered their professional opinions of Naturopathic Medicine due to lack of exposure.

Big media like Forbes has jumped on the “tin foil hat” bandwagon by supporting her claims that botanical medicine, nutrition, physical medicine, homeopathy, mind/body practices and stress management are invalid sciences without evidence. The American and Canadian federal Naturopathic associations have both started a counter-petition against these muckracking efforts.

All of this is personally upsetting for me. It stirs a complicated turmoil of emotions, injustice, pride, and frustration that mixes my own choices with a very clear working knowledge of the weight that “the big lie” technique can carry in the world of propaganda. All of this comes at a time when “Functional Medicine” and “Integrative Medicine” are the new darlings of allopathic medicine alongside epigenetics and the microbiome.

Newsflash: Functional Medicine and Integrative Medicine ARE evidence based Naturopathic Medicines, researched by and for NDs originally.

Naturopathic Doctors are systematically being defamed and slandered while our actual practice techniques are being picked up and renamed and celebrated for their effectiveness.

I feel helpless in the face of this complicated adversity. I made my personal choice to add an Osteopathic Degree to my knowledge base because there was more to medicine I wanted to know – pharmacology, emergency medicine, psychiatry, and other facets of transgender medicine I need additional training on. I know the great value of Naturopathic Medicine and so do a great number of North American consumers. I suppose I need to trust that the greater good will prevail in the end…. but that may not help me or my career path when I am placed in a hospital as an MSIII or resident with an attending like the Internist above who hates everything alternative and Naturopathic medicine stands for.

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The Lost Art

I am sick in an invisible way that people cant really see, and I don’t really feel – much. I can take a pill and make it mostly unnoticeable. Except for the fact that my hair falls out in handfuls with a certain kind of stress…

I consider myself an expert in self-care. And yet, I can hardly find the time to do the “little” things that I know could help. Like, nettle hair rinses, getting at least 8 hours of sleep every night, taking my fish oil, and eating more protein. Instead, I keep myself too busy and dull myself with things that make me feel better for a few hours, but never in the long run. I have fallen into the mindlessness of  modern health care where I want a pill to do the work of healing for me. Dammit!

We all have levels of health maintenance we are willing to do on a regular basis. Vitamins, exercise, water, organics, therapy, whatever. We each have a certain degree of self care required to maintain the status quo of daily function. But, what happens when that balance is tipped and we need to actually recover from an illness, injury, or accident?

I offer you an invitation to step off the rat wheel of everyday living, and create a luminal space for healing. A luminal space is an anthropology term that refers to a period of time “outside of time” – a step out of everyday living. Some health crisis force this through body fluid effluvia that ties one to the bathroom, or physical disability that prevents mobility. Too often we are able to power through a cold, or anxiety attack or injury and do not engage in the art of self care to allow actual healing. This is what snowballs into chronic illness / disease or chronic pain.

I have been “sick” for at least 9 months, but I haven’t made more than a few half-hearted efforts to engage in deep self care. I have taken lots of prescriptions and had lots of blood tests, but is that truly healing medicine? I finally broke my baby toe last week, and have been suddenly forced to slow down by immobility. I am doing hydrotherapy, making castor oil packs, cooking and eating good food, meditating, saying no to social engagements I don’t deeply want to do, and getting sleep. These are some of the cornerstones of deep self care.

It is very difficult to give ones self approval to close the door on society and expectations and family, and friends, and chores, and domestic duties, and distractions, and choose to do something solely for the self instead. We are culturally programmed to take care of business, pleasure, family, kids, dogs, and our homes before we take care of the inner self. If you are sick, at any level, you will heal faster, and better if you take the time to practice deep medicine by taking the time to take care of your self.

I am here to help you do that. And, I give myself permission to offer that same wisdom and practice for my self. The pills and the maintenance are not enough. We must engage the luminal, lost art of deep self care for complete health and healing.

 

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Counter-Response to the Multivitamin Controversy

This post was originally written for Apothecary By Design in December 2013 http://www.apothecarybydesign.com/blog/

Stop Wasting Money on Vitamin and Mineral Supplements! 5 medical doctors cried out in an editorial piece first released in the Annals of Internal Medicine, and then circulated through all major newspapers and social media outlets early this week.  The articles released in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, LA Times, and countless other newspapers pointed out that multivitamins have failed to show benefit in several large scale studies; however, the evidence reviewed was not as clear as we were led to believe. As with every evidence based study, it is important to look at the information behind the research, the studies cited, and the actual information the studies gathered.

The quality of multivitamins IS a true concern for consumers. The studies supporting multivitamins have been mixed, and we acknowledge this. If you are going to take a multivitamin it is not an effective use of money to buy a low quality product (like the one illustrated below) that is not well absorbed and/or is coated in toxic chemicals and fillers. A very good diet may reduce or eliminate the need for a daily dose of essential nutrients. Some multivitamins may be a waste of money, not because studies illustrate a lack of benefit, but because of the abysmal quality of the product itself. Choosing an appropriate multivitamin is another question – one that Apothecary by Design’s wellness specialists welcome.

The following studies were used to support the evidence that multivitamins are not worth taking:

fmgt4Yi09-XGE8j8WdSI0z2key4wGe5glRyJ-QC8wH2_S3x8dxi0mHnxUERU0zmV047v=s1001.     Multivitamins and cognitive decline in men 65 or older

For example, in the first study on cognition, the multivitamin assessed was a well-known  common multivitamin that provides low level nutrients in the cheapest, least bioavailable forms. These poor quality minerals generally include  oxides and sulphates. For example, magnesium sulfate is epsom salt, like you would use in a bath. Magnesium citrate is a better quality, more absorbable mineral. (See label) Check out the “other ingredients” as well – 3 artificial colors including the noxious FD&C Red #40.

Regardless of the supplement quality, cognition issues are not primarily related to vitamin/ mineral deficiencies, but are a long term response to heavy metal toxicity, poor cerebral perfusion (not enough blood to the brain), omega 3 deficiency, hormone deficiency, environmental contamination, stress and elevated cortisol levels, head trauma, prescription medication side effects and many more individual variants.

For example, how many of the physicians studied were also taking statin drugs? These ubiquitous prescription medications are known to have memory impairment, loss of memory and amnesia as potential side effects.

When presenting strong statements like multivitamins are a waste of money, it is responsible to use evidence that considers a straighter line between cause and effect.

2.     Multivitamins failed to reduce cardiovascular events in men and women with previous myocardial infarction

The second study cited as proof that multivitamins are a waste of money was a 2012 study evaluating the effects of chelation therapy on men and women over 65 with history of a heart attack.

This study had significant setbacks.  Chief among them were the high drop-out rates due to the strenuous protocol of 30 weekly chemical chelation infusions followed by 10 maintenance infusions two to eight weeks apart.

It is difficult to assess the effect of a multivitamin on long term health with such invasive chemical and vitamin therapies being administered at the same time, and it certainly clouds what is presented as a black and white result.

Antioxidants, nutritional counseling and botanical therapies are also first line treatments in the Integrative health world to repair myocardial function. Once again, the true nature of the study being cited is obscured by the dramatic headlines.

2.     Multivitamins did not prevent the development of chronic disease or death.

If only a simple, cheap, low dose, poor quality multivitamins could save the world from chronic disease….

Quality matters in the food we eat, the medications we take and the supplements we buy. Chronic disease is a complex, multifactorial health concern whose cure cannot be reduced to oversimplified statements like these.

Finally – the original article states “….beta carotene, vitamin E and possible high dose vitamin A supplements increase mortality.” What they leave out, is that high dose beta-carotene increases risk of … lung cancer in smokers (only.) And alpha-tocopherol vitamin E increases the risk of heart disease …but full spectrum vitamin E with both tocopherols and tocotrienols reduce the risk.  Limiting the information sensationalizes the story, obscures the evidence and limits its relevance.

The great thing about this editorial is that it exposes the poor quality multivitamins out there for what they can be: a sense of false security. No one can eat fast food regularly, take a poor quality low dose multivitamin, not practice any preventative measures, and not develop chronic disease eventually. That much IS true.

A multivitamin needs to be able to be absorbed, with high quality minerals and therapeutic dosages of vitamins at the very least to offer prevention and protection. These remain a worthwhile investment for people wanting to maximize their nutritional value. Furthermore, high quality children’s multivitamins remain a good nutritional adjunct for picky eaters and kids with behavioral or health issues. Multivitamins are not a substitute for a healthy lifestyle with good quality food choices, exercise, and stress reduction.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/medicalprofs/trial-to-assess-chelation-therapy-cvuv10n4.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10359235

http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/501471

http://www.nleducation.co.uk/resources/reviews/the-next-generation-vitamin-e-how-tocotrienols-benefit-the-heart-brain-and-liver/

Enough Is Enough: Stop Wasting Money on Vitamin and Mineral Supplements. Annals of Internal Medicine. Eliseo Guallar, MD, DrPH; Saverio Stranges, MD, PhD; Cynthia Mulrow, MD, MSc, Senior Deputy Editor; Lawrence J. Appel, MD, MPH; and Edgar R. Miller III, MD, Phd p. 850

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September 2013

IMG_1626Apples are in season again, so it must be time to go back to school. This year, I will be the one in front of the classroom! This is completely new for me, and I have been anxiously preparing mentally (and literally) for most of the summer. Academics are an important part of a doctors CV, and an area that I have studiously avoided in my career thus far. But when Corinne Martin at University of Southern Maine Nursing School contacted me about the program she has been developing as a holistic health minor for USM the fear was less than the excitement. I am honored to be teaching CON 284 Botanical Therapies for the fall semester. The course is an introductory level exploration some of the issues that surround medicinal plant use including historical dynamics, ecological effects and cultural perceptions of herbs. I will also be teaching practical clinical use of commonly used botanicals. We have guest speakers coming in, a practical how-to workshop on medicinal preparations, and a diverse reading list. Plant medicine has been foundational to my practice, and I am grateful for the opportunity to expand my own understanding and become more of a community resource!

I work primarily at the Age Management Center these days, with a strong focus on hormone health. I work with Dr. Michael Bedecs who is a Men’s Health expert, and is extremely experienced in hormone replacement. I am grateful to say he has taken me under his wing, and I have found a permanent place for my private practice here in Maine (and beyond.) It took almost two years to find the right work environment and business associate after owning my own clinic for 11 years in Toronto. Stay tuned for new articles on fertility,  perimenopause and transgender/transsexual health care. When working with hormones, it is impossible not to consider trans* health care, as this is a population often dependent on hormone use. Dr. Bedecs and I will continue to merge his extensive knowledge of hormone use with my specific integrative medicine training, community commitment, and health care activism to create a concierge style medical practice to serve all genders equally with cutting edge comprehensive treatment plans.

The other work I have been doing is more personal, learning how to trust my gut. Who is good at this? Tips? Strategies? It is so hard in this mixed modern world for me to be able to sift through the messages that come from outside vs. those that come from inside. What I have learned, is that if the inner messages are not heeded, outside havoc will soon result. Or, an event will occur with a big “I Told You So” tag on it. This is part of my process as a human – what is your process? We all have evolutionary issues that we work though, each as unique as stars. Having good guides – as partners, therapists, teachers, doctors, friends – is key to actually learning from our process and not repeating the same mistakes. I am lucky to have all of the above right now – except a good Dr. That is next on my list!

Thank you for reading through, for listening. My health story is mirrored in my life, and I know all of yours are too. It is the details of life that illustrate the pathways of disease and also those of health. Find yourself a Dr that will listen for the details, and trace paths. Take a new course. Call someone you miss. Step outside your comfort zone and do something professionally that scares you! It is September 2013, the time is ripe!

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Nutrition, Herbal Medicine, Homeopathy

Naturopathic medicine is not a single kind of healing, but is an array of healing practices. I think of Naturopathic Medicine as a wheel, and what we do as the different spokes that make up the whole. These “spokes” are called modalities, and include acupuncture, counseling, herbal medicine, functional medicine, homeopathy, massage, minor surgery, nutrition and in some states/provinces, prescription medications and/or IV therapies. Naturopathic Medicine is diverse – each doctor chooses what areas to focus on.  Many N.D.’s choose one specific modality, like acupuncture, functional medicine, or homeopathy. Others, like myself, are eclectic and utilize many of the modalities, depending on the individual case.

Acupuncture, counseling and massage are not as applicable for self care; however, nutrition, herbal medicine, and homeopathy are very important ways that people can take care of themselves. There is only so much help that Dr. Google can offer. If general information basics are not resolving the issue, or you have complex health concerns with multiple medications involved, having a licensed ND assist you in recovery is going to be the most effective and safest utilization of natural medicines.

NUTRITION is the philosophy of using food as medicine. Nutrition can be used therapeutically to treat specific conditions – such as eating beets and dandelion leaves for liver cleansing, or cabbage juice for ulcers. The foods that we eat in 2013 are very different from what our grandparents were eating. The soils are stripped of minerals (or toxic like on Munjoy Hill, ) many foods are genetically modified, and the preparation and processing of foods radically alters nutritional values. Supplementation is generally included with nutrition as it is often necessary, given today’s food choices, to supplement some nutrients that are no longer found in food.

HERBAL MEDICINE is an excellent way to treat the whole family. In theory, it is similar to using pharmaceuticals – specific components within each herb cause specific actions in the mind, body and spirit. Herbs can have a powerful action or a gentle action. Generally, the best herbs for self care are simple, common and safe for everyone in the family. If there are any specific contraindications such as interactions with medication, I would be sure to mention those.  The general dose for herbal medicine for an adult is 1 teaspoon of tincture (alcohol extract) in a small amount of water, 3 times a day. Teas are drank hot 2-3 times a day or as needed. Children’s dosage can be determined as follows:

Patients weight in lb divided by 150 = percent of dose

ie) 70 lb child / 150 = 0.46 so child gets slightly less that ½ adult dose.

If is 1 tsp 3 x a day for adult, give ½ tsp 3 times a day to child.

Herbs are generally best taken on an empty stomach, to maximize absorption.

HOMEOPATHY is a very complex system of medicine that gently supports the body’s ability to heal itself through the use of “remedies” and the philosophy that “like treats (or cures) like.”  The specific remedy chosen is one, which, if given to a healthy person, would elicit the very symptoms of an illness. Therefore, the remedy is known to cure that illness. Homeopathic treatment can be a profound journey of self-discovery as old wounds are healed and our true potential is illuminated. Explaining the mechanism of homeopathic medicine is difficult as it operates on the quantum level rather than the commonly understood Newtonian mechanism of action.  Symptoms are seen as effective reflections of compensation on the  mental, physical, and emotional levels. For example, when a warning light comes on in your car,  we investigate what was wrong with the engine, not just disconnect the light! Seen as warning lights, symptoms are the body’s way of showing the outside world that something is wrong or not working properly. The constellation of symptoms points the Homeopathic Doctor to understand the bigger picture overall, and which remedy is indicated to effectively treat the underlying condition. A Naturopath practicing Homeopathy gives a homeopathic remedy to stimulate the body’s defense systems to complete the healing process. This is the concept of the vital force: the body is always trying to move towards health.  This medicine is an extremely safe and effective method of eliminating disease.

 

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Alternative Medicine

A friend of mine recently asked me what Alternative Medicine was. Ask 50 people, and you may get 50 answers! I can tell you my answer. It is intricately tied in with Sociology, Cultural Studies, and Anthropology. To understand a cultures medicine is to have a clear window into their worldview. Modern American “Alternative Medicine” is a broad spectrum of many cultures traditional medical practices – Asian Medicine and Acupuncture, Indian Aruveda, Native American and “Eclectic (European western) Herbalism, German Homeopathy, and many others.

Alternative Medicine is the other side of Allopathic Medicine. Allopathic Medicine is the current model of western medicine implemented in 1909 by Flexner and the newly formed American Medicine Association at the turn of the century. Alternative Medicine and Allopathic Medicine differ in their basic model of patient care. The former is patient-based, where an individual story, environment, life experiences and constitution all play some role in the current health problem. The latter is based on symptom assessment and diagnosis, with an emphasis on pharmaceutical and surgical management. Truly – both are needed in modern medicine. The best care comes from a marriage of the two.

When this friend asked, I answered her with a reply of what Naturopathic Medicine is.  I believe Naturopathic Medicine represents the best of Alternative Medicine! It combines evidence-based medicine with a body of knowledge that is evidenced by time. Naturopathic Medicine is an umbrella term that relates to an Alternative Medical practices that all adhere to a general principle of care that is combined with modern cutting edge diagnostic and clinical-medical training. Naturopathic Doctors must complete a 4-year post-graduate program with licensing and board exams to ensure that the skills needing to be a “Doctor” as well as “Naturopathic” are met.

The basic theory of Naturopathic Medicine is in the Latin phrase vis medicatrix naturae. The vis is the inner ability of the body to heal itself – the guiding inner principle that all Alternative Medicines have (and most traditional cultures recognize.) Medicatrix is medicine. And naturae is Nature. The body has the inner medical ability to heal itself, with the help of nature. The Naturopathic toolbox assists in returning one to a state of health, and includes Asian medicine, botanical medicine, homeopathy, lifestyle counseling, massage (and other hands-on bodywork techniques), and nutrition. In some states and provinces ND’s are also able to prescribe some pharmaceuticals and perform minor surgery.

To summarize – Alternative Medicine is a broad term that includes many different cultures traditional medicines. Naturopathic Medicine is a branch of Alternative Medicine that unifies the practices under a licensed scope of care. A Naturopathic Doctor is the Alternative Medicine Physician, providing patient-based care founded on the theory that your body has an innate ability to heal, when given the proper nature-based treatments.

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Caffeine, Detoxification, and the Healing Crisis

Days after quitting caffeine, I started coughing up and eliminating nasty amounts of toxic looking phlegm from my sinus and lungs. (sorry for the descriptors.) I had been suffering from sneezing, clear drippy nose and “allergy” or “cold” symptoms for a couple of months previous to this. So, while I was disappointed to be getting sick over the holidays, it felt like I was finally getting “something out” of my system that had been brewing for a long time.

I have searched many databases for evidence based articles linking caffeine and sinus and have only found articles related to caffeine and heart disease. Apparently there is no evidence based link. However, in searching Dr. Google for other peoples opinions on caffeine and sinus health, there is a relationship between the two. Caffeine diminishes adrenal health by deleting epinephrine and affecting cortisol levels. This in turn affects the immune system and inflammatory levels, which can lead to increased candida levels causing chronic sinusitis.

The body wants to be in homeostasis. This means, the body seeks balance. In its natural state, without drugs, the human body will naturally produce secretions to eliminate microbes and return to its state of best health. This is one of the basic tenets of Naturopathic Medicine. This can produce what is known as a healing crisis. Fevers, vomiting, diarrhea, vaginal discharge, phlegm – secretions of various kinds are produced to aid the body in returning to its natural state. It can feel pretty awful to be in a healing crisis, but if you are able to trust that the body is actually working towards a state of improved health rather than spiraling towards destruction, it can bring about an awesome recovery. (This is also often what modern medicine is appropriate,  when medications or other medical interventions are appropriate interventions. The differential between the safe healing crisis and the situation needing medical intervention is the job of a ND.)

I haven’t felt too awful with this current “sinus and bronchial infection.” Although I have had copious elimination of some nasty stuff, my energy, appetite and general mood have been pretty good. I have been able to lay low, watch TV, do castor oil packs for my lungs, make soups, drink Cold Care and Throat Coat teas, and take anti-fungal and lung herbs to support the elimination. Overall although I am sick in a classical sense, I feel a renewal taking place. And, I have finally been able to kick the caffeine and headaches while avoiding the fatigue by resting so much! I will need to continue to work on my adrenal health and decrease sugar intake as candida has been flagged as a potential long term issue by this detox experience.

Everyone will have a different experience, and a different potential for a healing crisis. Age, stress levels, number of years on caffeine, gender, diet and nutrition levels all play into the effect caffeine has on the body, and the resulting effect its elimination can inspire.

Exerpt from http://www.health4youonline.com/article_sherridan_stock_conquering_candida.htm#Hypoadrenia

Hypoadrenia 

Several years ago we noted a correlation between healthy adrenal glands and the absence of candidiasis, and formed the opinion that healthy adrenal glands help protect against candidiasis. We now realize that the other side of the coin is perhaps more important: Candida commonly impairs adrenal functioning, sometimes severely so.

Having made this latter observation, we wondered about the possible mechanism.  Initially we supposed that the Candida infection constituted an adrenal stressor, like any other infection.  We then saw a lady in whom candidiasis was a major cause of hypoadrenia, and noted that the amino acids that supported her adrenal glands best were taurine, cysteine, and glycine – all antioxidants.  Following up this clue we then ascertained that Candida and its toxins appeared to be exerting a direct cytotoxic effect on the adrenal glands via free-radical activity.

Another mechanism suggested by our testing is that of Candida-induced autoimmune damage to the adrenal glands.  Several studies do, in fact, implicate Candida as a major cause of autoimmunity since it can reduce suppressor T-cell activity.(3)  Further, it is possible that because of a similarity between the protein sequence of the cell walls of Candida and that of human cells, antibodies directed at Candida may cross-react with human cells.(5)  We also wonder whether the presence of Candida and its toxins within a tissue causes the body to regard that tissue as non-self and therefore to initiate autoimmune attack.

Additionally, Candida toxins interfere with acetyl coenzyme A activity,(3) which could inhibit the synthesis of adrenal steroids, and further, it is believed that Candida possesses receptor sites that can bind adrenal steroids thus competing with host cells, producing apparent adrenal insufficiency.(3)

Exerpt: CONQUERING CANDIDA by Sherridan L. Stock BSc(Hons) CBiol FBiol FZS FRES

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On The Other Side of a Cold

6 days later, I’m finally feeling human. Colds can be so rotten! I felt so awful on Tuesday and Wednesday – headache, runny nose, achy, tired, sinus pain, sneezing. UGH. Everyone gets colds, and after this round I want to share some ways to get through them easier, and how to help them not turn into the 6 week sickness, or bronchitis, or worse….

I grew up in a Yoga Ashram where getting sick was considered “cleansing” and an opportunity to throw off toxins and heal the body. I still think of sickness in this framework to some degree, and as such embrace having a cold in the following ways (once I am willing to accept I am, in fact, sick, which is another story.)

I like to view mini-sicknesses like colds, flues, and other bugs as opportunities for a mini-detox. As soon as I realize I am sick, all cow dairy, sugar, alcohol, corn, beef and gluten are eliminated. I also try to wean off caffeine by only having 1/2 cups of black tea as needed for caffeine headaches. This automatically gives my immune system a huge boost to fight off the offenders (see my food sensitivity blog post.) It also allows my liver, intestines and kidneys to do a little detox of their own, cleaning up old metabolites while other systems fight off the cold. This helps me heal faster, and makes me feel even better once the cold is done! I also often lose a couple of pounds while being sick.

What does this leave to eat? Lots of fruit, rice, steamed veggies, rice cakes and 100% fruit jam, gluten free toast, butter (even tho its cow I allow this), nut butters, eggs, organic chicken, goat milk kefir or yogurt if craved. I just made a butternut squash, ginger, chicken broth soup with kale, apples and lemon this sickness. I also found a coconut milk, agave sweetened vanilla ice cream when I was craving something cold for my throat. And lots and lots and lots of herbal tea. With raw honey, and lemon.

Botanical Medicine is *very* important for treating colds. Most colds start out as viruses and then develop into bacterial infections after the immune system has been worn down. Unlike drugs, herbs can be antiviral AND anti-bacterial at the same time. As soon as I start feeling sick, out comes the elderberry syrup that lives in my medicine cabinet. 2 tsp 2-3 times a day, AND once a day for my girlfriend so she doesnt get sick. Start taking lots of vitamins – everything you have. Take your C’s, B’s, multivitamin…. your immune system is weak and needs support. Olive leaf is a great anti-microbial to take at any stage of sickness. The trick with herbs is to take alot, early.  As in, 2 caps three times a day for the first week, rather than 1 cap a day for 3-6 weeks of sickness. Traditional Medicinals has some great teas with a good mix of acute care herbs. I drank Cold Care PM night and day, with lots of honey as well as lemon ginger tea and echinacea tea.

A side note on echinacea – this herb is anti strep as well as antibacterial and antiviral and antifungal. Its actually a great herb for colds and flues *when taken right away.* Echinacea seems to work better for some people than others as well. If you are going to use this botanical, start taking it as soon as you feel sick in high doses. Once you have been sick more than 5 days, it is no longer as effective *unless* you are fighting a strep infection.

If you can, go see an acupuncturist immediately. Acupuncture can do great things for helping a cold to not settle into your lungs, and move it through you faster. I’m certain it also helped this cold not become a sinus infection and just stay at the superficial level. I see Hadley Clarke of www.zenkaiacupuncture.com although http://www.jadeintegratedhealth.com also helped me when I had a serious case of bronchitis last year.Chinese herbs are also very effective when prescribed by an acupuncturist, however they are not meant for self-prescribing.

Finally, REST. Sometimes I think I get sick when my mind or body really needs down time. Call in sick, and lie in front of the TV, or in your bed all day. Pad around in track pants and socks and drink tea and moan on the couch. Facebook, nap, eat soup, but don’t do anything productive. The body *really* needs time to heal, and repair, and fight the good fight, and cant do that if you are also trying to teach or lead or answer phones or tend bar or save the world do all the other active things we all do in a day.


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Boutique Medicine Designed

I am very excited about my new logo designed by www.theportlanddesigner.com. I was speaking with a valued mentor and friend today about Boutique Medicine and the innovative and yet old-fashioned concept of having a Dr on call, able to come to your home when s/he is needed, or to answer a medical phone call after hours or one weekends…. And I had the image of the old physicians bag come to mind. I have been branding the yellow cross – yellow for intellect, optimism, happiness and communication – and of course health care, and this is the brilliant marriage of the two!

Boutique medicine (home, skype or phone visits) are often combined with what is called Concierge Medicine. Patients “sign on” with a physician for a set monthly fee, which gives them unlimited access to the MD, ND, or DO for the year. This fee is usually derived from a simple math equation that includes the average # of visits per year, at an average cost per visit, divided by 12 and paid on a monthly basis. Concierge Doctors work outside of the standardized healthcare system, thus avoiding insurance companies entirely. At this point, I am only working on the Boutique model, but I may implement Concierge Medicine in the future. Would you be interested? Email me your opinions at thewrightnd@gmail.com, I would love to know! All emails are confidential.

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Introducing……

The kitchen table has seen generations of families, friends, and lovers sit down to talk about what is really wrong. Its where we cry fresh tears, or hold them back. Its where we open mail, check email, or sit down for a long phone chat. Its a place of connection, convenience, and commiseration. The kitchen is the heart of every household, and the center of a families nourishment. Kitchen Table Naturopathics is all of this and more!

Based on the modern concept of boutique medicine and the classic model of country family physician, Kitchen Table Naturopathics offers phone sessions, skype consultations, and at home visits at your kitchen table or mine. Free initial 15 minute assessments are available in person or over the phone, to ensure we can work well together.

Please call for a Fee Schedule or email thewrightnd@gmail.com to set up an appointment. I look forward to seeing you soon!

 

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